Using aviation to entertain
and educate girls about
their limitless
opportunities...
Using aviation to entertain
and educate girls about
their limitless
opportunities...
Using aviation to entertain
and educate girls about
their limitless
opportunities...
TM
Email Jessica!
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Using aviation to entertain
and educate girls about
their limitless
opportunities...
Using aviation to entertain
and educate girls about
their limitless
opportunities...
Using aviation to entertain
and educate girls about
their limitless
opportunities...
TM
UH-60 (Black Hawk) pilot- US Army

I'm Jessie Freeman, stationed at Ft. Rucker, Alabama, originally from
Louisville, Colorado. I have a cat, Fiona, and a horse Brodie who is back
home with my family.

When I was a kid I was obsessed with becoming an astronaut, as I got older
I had zero aviation influences until college. My brother got his private license
and took me up for the first time when I was a freshman in college, I knew
then and there that I was meant to fly... I just had no idea how to go about
it!

I began taking lessons, got a job at an FBO/flight school. I'd been planning
on the military for awhile, and began looking into the the various flight
programs. My CFI was a former Army guy and RAVED about the Army flight
program. It took awhile to wrap my head around rotary-wing aircraft, and I
still love fixed wing, but these whirly birds are AMAZING! Other influences
were just scores of pilots coming into the FBO. I got every perspective you
can imagine, and made a very informed decision.

What convinced me to become an Army aviator was the desire to serve my
country, the men and women who serve/served have always been my
heroes. The opportunity to join their ranks is beyond an honor for me.

I think the biggest obstacle I faced along the way was my own uncertainty.
Sure, there were nay-sayers along the way who didn't think that I could get
here, but I let those people get to me, and it took awhile to get over that.

The most important lesson I've learned (and am still learning), is that you
can do literally ANYTHING you put your mind to. The great thing about the
Army is that it has MADE me push myself beyond any limits I thought I had.
I've also learned to listen, ask TONS of questions, and ask for help. Aviation
is a small and tight community and if you do those three things, there will
always be someone who wants to help you achieve your goals.

I started out flying Cessna 152 and 172's, have flown a friend's Champ, and
a few others along the way. In the Army I qualified in a TH-67 trainer (civilian
equivalent is a Bell 206), and am currently being trained in the UH-60 Black
Hawk helicopter.

UH-60 missions include: Air assault, troop transport/insertion, med-evac
(medical evacuation), sling loads, med escort, cargo transport etc. Honestly
there are so many missions this probably only covers a handful. I would
personally love to do med-evac, but my mission will depend on the unit I'm
supporting. I chose the UH-60 because I want to support the ground
troops. I'm told that there's no feeling in the world like saving someone's life
by air-lifting them to medical support, out of a fire-fight, or even bringing
mail/supplies to troops that haven't seen any for several weeks.

I love my job because I learn something new every day, and I work with
amazing people, LOTS of unsung heroes, most of whom have a deep
passion for flying.

When I first moved to Ft. Rucker for flight school, a friend and I went out for
drinks. A few guys came over to talk to us and one asked me whose
daughter I was. I asked him what he meant by that, and he informed me
that he knew I wasn't a flight student so I must be some officer's
daughter... Boy was he surprised. :) Most people seem surprised, but in
general are also extremely encouraging and complimentary.

What role do skills in math, science, engineering and technology play
in supporting your job? What training did you undergo getting to
where you are?
My college degree is in pre-law, but we use math, science
and technology every day in Army aviation. I've been through intensive
academics in aerodynamics, theory of flight/rotary wing flight, aviation
weather, just to name a few.

We also have to pass several exams specific to our each of our airframe's
systems including engines, rotor systems, transmissions, flight controls,
pneumatic systems etc. Coming from a background with very little of these
influences, I'd say ANY and all training in science/tech/math would be HIGHLY
valuable for this career.

What activities do you suggest for young children or young adults to
prepare them for a career like yours? What are your future plans?
I
think with any aviation career you should surround yourself with aviation,
any way you can, even if it’s just sitting at an airport listening and observing.
Ask questions of anyone willing to talk to you, and read read read. If you
want to specifically fly Army, add run run run to that mix! I am just
beginning my Army career, but right now I plan to make a career of it.
Someday I'd like to own an FBO/flight school and help more kids realize their
dreams in aviation.  

If anyone would like help/advice for becoming an Army aviator, I'd be happy
to help/point you in the direction for help. Please use the contact me form on
this page!